Miss Leavitt’s Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe Great Discoveries

#ad
W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Unknown in our day, she was employed by the harvard Observatory as a mere number-cruncher, Leavitt was no more recognized in her own: despite her enormous achievement, at a wage not dissimilar from that of workers in the nearby textile mills. Miss leavitt’s Stars uncovers her neglected history. A short, excellent account of Leavitt’s extraordinary life and achievements.

Simon singh, new york times book reviewgeorge johnson brings to life Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who found the key to the vastness of the universe—in the form of a “yardstick” suitable for measuring it.

#ad



The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars

#ad
Penguin Books #ad - Cecilia helena payne,  who in 1956 became the first ever woman professor of astronomy at Harvard—and Harvard’s first female department chair. Their ranks included williamina fleming, a scottish woman originally hired as a maid who went on to identify ten novae and more than three hundred variable stars; Annie Jump Cannon, who designed a stellar classification system that was adopted by astronomers the world over and is still in use; and Dr.

They helped discern what stars were made of, divided the stars into meaningful categories for further research, and found a way to measure distances across space by starlight. At the outset this group included the wives, Wellesley, and daughters of the resident astronomers, sisters, but soon the female corps included graduates of the new women's colleges—Vassar, and Smith.

The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars #ad - Elegantly written and enriched by excerpts from letters, diaries, and memoirs, The Glass Universe is the hidden history of the women whose contributions to the burgeoning field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe. Anna palmer draper, the widow of a pioneer in stellar photography—enabled the women to make extraordinary discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim.

Wilson literary Science Writing Award"A joy to read. The wall street journal in the mid-nineteenth century, or “human computers, the Harvard College Observatory began employing women as calculators, ” to interpret the observations their male counterparts made via telescope each night. As photography transformed the practice of astronomy, the ladies turned from computation to studying the stars captured nightly on glass photographic plates.

#ad



The Constants of Nature: The Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe

#ad
Vintage #ad - In the constants of Nature, Cambridge Professor and bestselling author John D. Barrow takes us on an exploration of these governing principles. Reality as we know it is bound by a set of constants—numbers and values that dictate the strengths of forces like gravity, the speed of light, and the masses of elementary particles.

But he also suggests that the basic forces may have been radically different during the universe’s infancy, and suggests that they may continue a deeply hidden evolution. Drawing on physicists such as Einstein and Planck, Barrow illustrates with stunning clarity our dependence on the steadfastness of these principles.

The Constants of Nature: The Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe #ad - Perhaps most tantalizingly, Barrow theorizes about the realities that might one day be found in a universe with different parameters than our own.

#ad



Look Up!: Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer

#ad
Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books #ad - Henrietta spent years measuring star positions and sizes from photographs taken by the telescope at the Harvard College Observatory, where she worked. This ebook edition also includes audio accompaniment. An astronomer of her time called henrietta leavitt “one of the most important women ever to touch astronomy, ” and another close associate said she had the “best mind at the Harvard Observatory.

Henrietta leaveitt's story will inspire young women and aspiring scientists of all kinds and includes additional information about the solar system and astronomy. Henrietta levitt was the first person to discover the scientific importance of a star’s brightness—so why has no one heard of her? Learn all about a female pioneer of astronomy in this picture book biography with audio.

Look Up!: Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer #ad - Henrietta swan leavitt was born on July 4, 1868, and she changed the course of astronomy when she was just twenty-five years old. After henrietta observed that certain stars had a fixed pattern to their changes, her discovery made it possible for astronomers to measure greater and greater distances—leading to our present understanding of the vast size of the universe.

#ad



Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World

#ad
Broadway Books #ad - The force that once seemed inconsequential was revealed to be responsible for everything from the structure of the atom to the functioning of our brains. Here too is alan turing, whose dream of a marvelous thinking machine—what we know as the computer—was met with indifference, and who ended his life in despair after British authorities forced him to undergo experimental treatments to “cure” his homosexuality.

In harnessing its power, we have created a world of wonders—complete with roller coasters and radar, computer networks and psychopharmaceuticals. In electric universe, before inventing the telegraph, and samuel morse, a painter who, who struggled against the prejudices of the British class system, the great discoverers come to life in all their brilliance and idiosyncrasy, including the visionary Michael Faraday, ran for mayor of New York City on a platform of persecuting Catholics.

Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World #ad - For centuries, electricity was seen as little more than a curious property of certain substances that sparked when rubbed. Then, in the 1790s, alessandro Volta began the scientific investigation that ignited an explosion of knowledge and invention. From the frigid waters of the atlantic to the streets of Hamburg during a World War II firestorm to the interior of the human body, Electric Universe is a mesmerizing journey of discovery.

The bestselling author of e=mc2 weaves tales of romance, divine inspiration, and fraud through an account of the invisible force that permeates our universe—electricity—and introduces us to the virtuoso scientists who plumbed its secrets.

#ad



They Laughed at Galileo: How the Great Inventors Proved Their Critics Wrong

#ad
Skyhorse #ad - Edward L. Drake’s eventual success on august 27, 1859, was called the day “the crazy man first struck oil. Louis pasteur’s theory of germs was considered a “ridiculous fiction. Each of these inventions has had a profound effect on the course of human history, and each one was rejected, resisted, and ridiculed in its day.

Ultimately, the innovators who brought these into existence provided invaluable contributions to science and the culture of humankind. For them, the future was clear and obvious, including the acknowledged experts of their days, but for the vast majority, such belief was sheer folly. For just about everything that has improved our modern lifestyles in a way that our ancestors could not possibly imagine, there was once a lone dreamer proclaiming, “It can be done.

They Laughed at Galileo: How the Great Inventors Proved Their Critics Wrong #ad - That dreamer was nearly always opposed by a team of “enlightened” contemporaries publicly declaring, “It cannot be done. Well, yes it could. Marconi’s wireless radio transmissions were initially deemed pointless. A humorous account of great inventors and their critics who predicted failure. They laughed at galileo takes a humorous and reflective look at one thousand years of the development of humankind: those who dreamt, those who taught, those who opposed, and those who, ultimately, did.

At some point in modern history, or a handful of people, each and every one of our inventions and discoveries was first envisioned and then developed by a single person, who dreamt of the seemingly impossible.

#ad



Higgs Discovery: The Power of Empty Space Kindle Single

#ad
Ecco #ad - On july 4, 2012, physicists at the large hadron Collider in Geneva madehistory when they discovered an entirely new type of subatomic particle that many scientists believe is the Higgs boson. For forty years, physicists searched for this capstone to the Standard Model of particle physics—the theory that describes both the most elementary components that are known in matter and the forces through which they interact.

Higgs Discovery: The Power of Empty Space Kindle Single #ad - In higgs discovery, its exhilarating implications, Lisa Randall explains the science behind this monumental discovery, and the power of empty space. This particle points to the Higgs field, which provides the key to understanding why elementary particles have mass.

#ad



Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics

#ad
Basic Books #ad - But these two giants did more than just criticize: they fought back, seeking a Theory of Everything that would make the universe seem sensible again. In einstein's dice and schrödinger's cat, first as collaborators and then as competitors, physicist Paul Halpern tells the little-known story of how Einstein and Schrödinger searched, for a theory that transcended quantum weirdness.

Einstein famously quipped that god does not play dice with the universe, and Schrödinger constructed his famous fable of a cat that was neither alive nor dead not to explain quantum mechanics but to highlight the apparent absurdity of a theory gone wrong. The current challenging situation in physics. Wall street journalwhen the fuzzy indeterminacy of quantum mechanics overthrew the orderly world of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger were at the forefront of the revolution.

Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics #ad - And while einstein and schrödinger failed in their attempt to explain everything in the cosmos through pure geometry, the development of string theory has, in its own quantum way, brought this idea back into vogue. As in so many things, even when they were wrong, Einstein and Schrödinger couldn't help but get a great deal right.

As halpern explains, the recent discovery of the Higgs Boson makes the Standard Model-the closest thing we have to a unified theory- nearly complete. This story of their quest-which ultimately failed-provides readers with new insights into the history of physics and the lives and work of two scientists whose obsessions drove its progress.

Today, much of modern physics remains focused on the search for a Theory of Everything. Neither man was ever satisfied with the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, however, and both rebelled against what they considered the most preposterous aspect of quantum mechanics: its randomness.

#ad



The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World

#ad
Broadway Books #ad - Inspired by the great 17th century scientific reformer and political figure Francis Bacon—another former student of Cambridge—the Philosophical Breakfast Club plotted to bring about a new scientific revolution. Recognizing that they shared a love of science as well as good food and drink they began to meet on Sunday mornings to talk about the state of science in Britain and the world at large.

Drawing upon the voluminous correspondence between the four men over the fifty years of their work, Laura J. A fascinating book. About the way four geniuses at Cambridge University revolutionized modern science. Newsweekthe philosophical breakfast club recounts the life and work of four men who met as students at Cambridge University: Charles Babbage, John Herschel, William Whewell, and Richard Jones.

Whewell who not only invented the word “scientist, mathematical economics, babbage a mathematical genius who invented the modern computer, Herschel who mapped the skies of the Southern Hemisphere and contributed to the invention of photography, and the science of tides, ” but also founded the fields of crystallography, and Jones a curate who shaped the science of economics were at the vanguard of the modernization of science.

The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World #ad - Snyder exposes the political passions, religious impulses, rivalries, friendships, and love of knowledge—and power—that drove these extraordinary men. Snyder shows how friendship worked to spur the men on to greater accomplishments, and how it enabled them to transform science and help create the modern world.

The lives and works of these men come across as fit for Masterpiece Theatre.

#ad



It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics

#ad
William Collins #ad - It all adds up also tells the story of how mapping the trajectory of an eclipse has helped to trace the precise day of one of the oldest battles in history, how the course of the modern-day Greenwich Meridian was established, and why negative numbers were accepted just last century. This book is a vital compendium of the great men and women of mathematics from Aristotle to Ada Lovelace, which demonstrates how mathematics shaped the written word and the world.

They are so indispensable that we forget how fundamental they are to our way of life. In this international bestseller, Mickaël Launay mixes history and anecdotes from around the world to reveal how mathematics became pivotal to the story of humankind. In museums, he uses the objects around us to explain what art can reveal about geometry, monuments or train stations, how Babylonian scholars developed one of the first complex written languages, and how ‘Arabic’ numbers were adopted from India.

It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics #ad - Supporting the belief that – just like music or literature – maths should be accessible to everyone, Launay will inspire a new fondness for the numbers that surround us and the rich stories they contain. Fascinating … so enlightening that suddenly maths doesn’t seem so fearsome as it once did’ SIMON WINCHESTERFrom Aristotle to Ada Lovelace: a brief history of the mathematical ideas that have forever changed the world and the everyday people and pioneers behind them.

It is a journey into numbers with Launay as a guide. The story of our best invention yet. From our ability to calculate the passing of time to the algorithms that control computers and much else in our lives, numbers are everywhere.

#ad



The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World: Leibniz, Spinoza and the Fate of God in the Modern World

#ad
W. W. Norton & Company #ad - In between trips to the opera and groundbreaking work in mathematics, he took every opportunity to denounce Spinoza, and jurisprudence, philosophy, relishing his self-appointed role as “God’s attorney. In this exquisitely written philosophical romance of attraction and repulsion, greed and virtue, religion and heresy, Matthew Stewart gives narrative form to an epic contest of ideas that shook the seventeenth century—and continues today.

Meanwhile, in the glittering salons of Paris, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was climbing the ladder of courtly success. Exhilarating…stewart has achieved a near impossibility, creating a page-turner about jousting metaphysical ideas, casting thinkers as warriors. Liesl schillinger, new york times book reviewonce upon a time, philosophy was a dangerous business—and for no one more so than for Baruch Spinoza, the seventeenth-century philosopher vilified by theologians and political authorities everywhere as “the atheist Jew.

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World: Leibniz, Spinoza and the Fate of God in the Modern World #ad - As his inflammatory manuscripts circulated underground, Spinoza lived a humble existence in The Hague, grinding optical lenses to make ends meet.

#ad